Amen - The Voice of Many Waters

It is interesting that Jesus began important statements with the word, "Amen." The original editors of the AKJV, [Authorized King James Version], of the Holy Bible made a departure from their usual verbatim translations, in the case of the word, "Amen," which is often found at the beginning of statements by Christ. Those writers of the AKJV substituted the word, "verily," for the Greek, "Amen." Perhaps, they thought that "Amen," per se, only belonged at the end of a sentence, due to the long tradition of prayers ending with, "Amen."

In any case, the AKJV, original editors substituted the word, "Verily," for the word that Jesus actually used, "Amen." Needless to say, "verily," is a word found in use at the time that the AKJV was written, i.e., 1611. Of course, Jesus Christ can speak any language, with ease. However, during the time of His ministry in the Holy Land, Jesus is believed to have spoken in Aramaic or Hebrew, most of the time. "Amen," was a word often used. Shakespearean English was not in general use at that time!

"281. [see Strong's Concordance for Greek text] 'amen, am-ane'; of Heb. or. [543]; prop. firm., i.e., (fig.) trustworthy; adv. surely (often as interj. So be it): - amen, verily."

"543. [see Strong's Concordance for Hebrew text] 'âmên, aw-mane'; from 539; sure; abstr. faithfulness; adv. truly:\0x2013 Amen, so be it, truth."

However, the word, "Amen," is much more than the merely expected punctuation, at the end of a prayer. Because "Amen" is very Holy, it is good to use it in prayer. However, the "Amen" is not always given the reverence that great Holiness deserves. Jesus begins very important statements by saying "Amen," or even "Amen, Amen." Why does Jesus use that particular, very Holy word?

ST. JOHN 1:1

"In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
2 The same was in the beginning with God.
3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made."

Revelation 3:14

"These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God;"
The "Amen" is, "...the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God;" the "Word" is also in the beginning, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. Consequently, both the "Amen" and the "Word" are in the beginning, and are the beginning:

• The "Amen" is "the beginning of the creation of God;"
• "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
• 2 The same was in the beginning with God.
• 3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made."

So, St. John seems to think that "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." And, Jesus seems to think that "These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God;"

So, who's right? Jesus? or, John? Jesus states that the "Amen" is "the beginning of the creation of God;" whereas, John states that "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
2 The same was in the beginning with God.
3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made."

The only way that they can both be right is if the, "Word," is identical to the, "Amen."
So, if the, "Word, was with God, and the Word was God." Then... is "Amen" the "Word?" If the "Word" is "Amen," then: what is the proper pronunciation of the "Word," "Amen?" Well, according to The Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, the correct pronunciations are as follows:

"281. [see Strong's Concordance for Greek text] 'amen, am-ane'; of Heb. or. [543]; prop. firm., i.e., (fig.) trustworthy; adv. surely (often as interj. So be it): - amen, verily."

"543. [see Strong's Concordance for Hebrew text] 'âmên, aw-mane'; from 539; sure; abstr. faithfulness; adv. truly: - Amen, so be it, truth."
It is obvious that the Greek "Amen," comes from the Hebrew "Amen." The Hebrews were saying "Amen," long before Hellenism became the classical model for the civilized world. Therefore, the truest pronunciation of "Amen" will be the Hebrew, which, is phonetically spelled: "aw-mane'." However, just to make things more complicated, we need one more go at the Strong's Concordance, because the Hebrew "Amen" has a root word. That word is listed in the Strong's Concordance as: 539, in the Hebrew Dictionary:

"539. [see Strong's Concordance for Hebrew text] 'âman, aw-man'; a prim. root; prop. to build up or support; to foster as a parent or nurse; fig. to render (or be) firm or faithful, to trust or believe, to be permanent or quiet"

It is very interesting that both the "Amen," and it's root word "âman" are the same phonetically except for the last letter of "Amen," which is the "e," - [ aw-mane'; vs. aw-man' ]. This means that the correct pronunciation for the beginning of both words is identical: "aw-m." Why is this interesting? Simply because it corresponds exactly with the pronunciation for the extremely ancient Sanskrit word: "Aum." ~ ( Which is even more ancient than Hebrew.) ~ The ancient root word or sound "Aum," is so similar to the, "aw-m," of, "aw-mane'" as well as "aw-man'" that a coincidence strains credulity. The next fact to consider is that the word "Aum" represents the cosmic vibratory energy of GOD, which created everything. Finally, "Aum" is the Sanskrit word for the, HOLY GHOST. It is noteworthy, that Jesus identifies the "Amen" as "the beginning of the creation of God;" and that the correct pronunciation of "Amen" [the "aw-m" of "aw-mane'"] is so similar to the word "Aum." Can it be a coincidence that both "Amen" and "Aum" refer specifically to the beginning of the creation of GOD?

Contrary to the popular misconceptions about thousands of Indian deities ~ which is more like over enthusiasm inventing new names for aspects of GOD ~ the extremely ancient religion of India [before it was named "India" by the Greeks], had a Triune concept of GOD, with: The Father, The Son, and the HOLY GHOST. Naturally, ancient Sanskrit names are different from the Greek and Hebrew, such as "Aum," for the HOLY GHOST. And of course, the HOLY GHOST is part of "our" Western Trinity.

The last parallel is that the Amen / Word is with GOD, and the Word is God; and the Aum / Word, is representing the creative cosmic vibratory energy of GOD, i.e., Sanskrit for the HOLY GHOST. Both Words are with God "In the beginning." These two Holy Words represent aspects of the Holy Trinity. Both Holy Words invoke God."

Amen.